ETHICS POLICY.

Its Sexy To Share;

Vazi Couture does not give support – directly or indirectly – to any political party or group nor does it take sides in national or international conflicts or disputes in accordance with our Code of Conduct. In keeping with this policy, you must not identify the Vazi Couture name with any political party or group or any one side in such conflicts or disputes.

Displays of political affiliation or support for partisan causes have no place in our newsrooms. No member of editorial, whether a journalist or support worker, may wear campaign buttons, badges or items of clothing bearing political slogans on the job, nor bring posters, pamphlets and other political material to the workplace to distribute or display.

Outside work, Vazi Couture respects the right (and in some countries the obligation) of staff to vote in elections and referendums and does not seek to interfere with that right. The company also recognizes that staff enjoys certain fundamental freedoms as a result of their nationality or where they live. Vazi Couture, however, expects journalistic staff in all branches of editorial to be keenly sensitive to the risk that their activities outside work may open their impartiality to questioning or create a perception of bias.

Such perceptions can undermine the integrity not only of the individual but of all journalists at Vazi Couture and damage the company’s reputation. In some societies, individuals who sign petitions or join demonstrations may be monitored by the authorities and evidence could be used to damage their reputation or restrict our newsgathering operations. In other countries, individuals who contribute to political campaign funds have their names on the public record. Again, such evidence may be used by those who would seek to undermine the good name of Vazi Couture, its staff or our profession. A policy designed to protect our standing as a news service free from bias cannot be policed. It relies on trust and an expectation that staff will refrain from activities that might whatever the intention, raise perceptions of a conflict, and that they will consult their manager in any case of doubt. Where such perceptions of a conflict do arise, Vazi Couture may in some cases ultimately require the journalist to move to other duties. Individuals should use their common sense, The Trust Principles, and the values of unbiased journalism in deciding whether to donate to certain charitable causes or be active in the affairs of their community. A conflict is unlikely to arise but staff in any doubt should consult their manager. The same principles apply to any doubts about a possible perception of a conflict that may arise from the activities of a close family member.